COVID Vaccine Information For Maryland Residents

COVID Vaccine Information for Maryland Residents

Updated January 21, 2021

Current COVID-19 vaccine supply is limited, and vaccination will happen in phases. While more doses are being produced to meet the demand, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have identified high-risk, high-priority groups whom they recommend to receive the vaccine first. Each state is reviewing the guidance from the CDC and ACIP and determining who gets the vaccine and when in their state.

If you live and work in different states:
To understand when you qualify for the COVID-19 vaccine based on your job (e.g., if you’re an essential worker), please look at the phases for the state where you work. To understand when you qualify for the COVID-19 vaccine based on your age or health conditions, look at the phases for the state where you live.

Below is detailed information on how the state of Maryland is defining the phases of COVID-19 vaccination. Click here to read our frequently asked questions or scroll to the bottom of this page.

 

What phase is Maryland currently in? 

CURRENT PHASE: Maryland is currently finishing Phase 1a and has begun Phase 1b.

Phase 1a (in progress)

Who qualifies? 

  • Front line hospital staff and healthcare workers 
  • Nursing home residents and staff  
  • Law enforcement and firefighters, EMS  
  • All licensed, registered and certified health care providers  
  • Correctional health care staff and officers  
  • Front line judiciary staff  

 Phase 1b (in progress)

Who qualifies?

  • Assisted living, other congregate settings 
  • Adults age 75 and older 
  • Education and continuity of government 

 

NEXT PHASE: Phase 1c (begins Monday, January 25)

Who qualifies?

  • Adults age 65-74
  • Essential workers in lab services, agriculture, manufacturing, postal service, etc.

 

LATER PHASES

Phase 2

Who qualifies?

  • Adults 16-64 at increased risk of severe COVID-19 illness due to comorbidities
  • Essential workers in critical utilities, transportation, food service, etc.

Phase 3

Who qualifies? 

  • General population, including healthy adults age 16-64

 

For more information on each phaseclick here. 


For Kaiser Permanente members – Frequently Asked Questions 

What should I do if I’m a qualified healthcare worker in Phase 1a but have not yet received the vaccine?
If you qualify to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in phase 1a but you have not yet been vaccinated and want an appointment to be vaccinated, please visit kp.org and send a secure message to your doctor’s office. Log in to kp.org, click “Message Center,” then click “Compose” and select “Doctor’s Office” to send a message explaining that you are a healthcare worker and qualify for the COVID-19 vaccine in Phase 1a. Within 48 hours, you will receive a secure email message acknowledging receipt of your email. As soon as the state supplies us enough vaccine to vaccinate you, you will receive another secure message from your healthcare team with a link to schedule your vaccine appointment. At this time, vaccine supplies are very limited. Please know that we are actively working with local departments of health to secure vaccine supply.
What should I do if I’m a qualified essential worker under Phase 1b, but have not yet received a vaccine?
At this time, we do not have enough vaccine supply to vaccinate essential workers who qualify in Phase 1b. Please know that we are actively working with local departments of health to secure enough vaccine supply. We are in the process of developing a process so our members who qualify as essential workers in Phase 1b can be vaccinated as soon as supply allows. If you are offered a vaccine through your employer or other vaccine provider, please accept the offer to get vaccinated.

Once I qualify to be vaccinated, how do I get an appointment to be vaccinated at Kaiser Permanente?

Because vaccine supply is limited, we will continue to vaccinate the highest risk first. The fastest way for us to contact you when you qualify for the vaccine is by sending you a secure email through kp.org. If you are a registered kp.org member, that will be the first way we contact you. If you are not registered on kp.org or if you do not open the secure message we send you through kp.org, we will call you. If we cannot reach you by kp.org or phone, we will send you a letter.

If you are not registered on kp.org, please register today so we can quickly contact you when you are eligible for the vaccine and we have supply to vaccinate you.

If my employer, local government or other vaccine provider (outside of Kaiser Permanente) offers me a COVID-19 vaccine, should I take it? 

If you are offered the vaccine at another venue, please go ahead and get vaccinated. Please note: wherever you receive the first dose of the vaccine will also need to administer your second dose of the vaccine. Regardless of where you get the vaccine, you will incur no cost. If you get the vaccine outside of Kaiser Permanente, the outside provider may bill Kaiser Permanente; if they do, we will reimburse them.

If I receive my COVID-19 vaccine outside Kaiser Permanente, how do I update my medical record?

Log onto kp.org, click on the “Medical Record”, and then select the “Questionnaires” option. Then click on the questionnaire titled “COVID-19 Immunizations outside of Kaiser Permanente” and fill out all required fields.

For people not covered by Kaiser Permanente insurance:

I am not covered by Kaiser Permanente insurance, but I would like to come to a Kaiser Permanente medical center to be vaccinated.  Can I?

We are partnering closely with the local county health departments to vaccinate the groups they designate from the community. Please call your local health department to learn which sites are available for you to get the vaccine.

Can I walk into a medical center to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

No. COVID-19 vaccines can only be provided by appointment.

 

More COVID-19 vaccination resources: 

COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines: Pfizer and Moderna

What to expect after you receive your COVID-19 vaccination 

COVID-19 vaccine: facts and myths